What is the National Day of the Cowboy?

Created in 2005, the National Day of the Cowboy celebrates the role and contributions that cowboys and cowgirls have made to America’s history and culture. The NDOC organization even gives out awards to individuals and organizations that promote and preserve pioneer and cowboy history! The day is observed on the fourth Saturday in July, so that means this year, July 24th will be the day to put on your boots and saddle up!

Cowboys began appearing in the heartland and wild west after the Civil War. Working mostly as ranchers and ranch hands, cowboys raised cattle and horses, and herded them across the plains to slaughterhouses. And since the western frontier was still widely unexplored at the time, it was a lawless land that swirled with riches, adventure and violence. Amid this backdrop, the mythical, stoic image of the cowboy became popular. 

Now you may be wondering how you can celebrate the National Day of the Cowboy. Well, you could put on a cowboy hat, go to a rodeo, and then come home and listen to these country western songs that we picked out for you. Find a partner, say howdy and have a hog-killin’ time square-dancing the night away!

Roy Rogers – Don’t Fence Me In

Known in his heyday as the “King of the Cowboys,” Ray Rogers acted and sang in over 100 Western films. This 1944 tune, which he sang with his wife Doris Rogers, became known across the country and for generations to come as the cowboy theme song. Oh, give me land, lots of land under starry skies above…

Marty Robinson – The Streets of Laredo (Cowboys Lament)

Derived from a traditional Irish folk song, titled “The Unfortunate Rake,” this cowboy ballad was named one of Top 100 Western songs of all time and has become a folk music standard. In the song, a dying cowboy tells his story to another cowboy in Laredo, Texas.  

Gene Autry – Back in The Saddle Again

Nicknamed the “Singing Cowboy,” Gene Autry personified the honest, brave and true hero, and he was a significant pioneer in the history of country music. “Back in the Saddle Again” was first released in 1939 and became Autry’s signature song because who wouldn’t want to be transported to the land where the longhorn cattle feed on the lowly gypsum weed?

Janis Siegel, John Di Martino & Lonnie Plaxico – Always On My Mind

This bittersweet, remorseful ballad, made famous by the outlaw country star Willie Nelson, is given a jazz treatment in this brand-new version. Including a lovely flute solo from Aaron Heick, this rendition really pulls at your heartstrings. Tell me that your sweet love hasn’t died…

If you’re looking for more country tunes to celebrate the National Day of the Cowboy, check out our newly released album, Cryin’ in My Whiskey, which is available in our store and on all major music platforms. And if you’d like one of our talented musicians to perform at your event, please contact us today! 

What music is good to listen to while doing yoga?

Whether you enjoy Hatha, yin, hot, Bikram, vinyasa, or aerial yoga, it’s undeniable that yoga improves strength, balance, and flexibility while also relaxing your mind and body. And after the year that we’ve had, relaxation sounds like something we could all use a bit more of! Here are some soothing songs to help you let go of negative energy, absorb the positive and ease yourself into some of those more challenging poses!   

Lorca Hart Trio – Here’s That Rainy Day

A good thing about yoga is that it can be done both outside and inside. So, don’t fret if it’s raining and gray outside! Just grab your mat, roll it out in the living room and get into an easy seated position. Take a deep breath, clear your mind, close your eyes and listen to the tenor sax while raindrops sprinkle softly against the roof. Visualize the deep gray clouds gliding lazily past, in no hurry to reach their destination. You are completely at peace just like the drifting clouds.

Bill Evans – Peace Piece

This simple piece, recorded in 1958 by the influential jazz pianist, Bill Evans, has a peaceful melody and meditative feel to it, which evokes a pastoral scene. Green meadows of daisies, cloudy blue skies and sun shining on your serene and strong tree pose. Feel the breeze on your skin. Keep yourself rooted firmly in the present moment. Nothing can knock you down.  

Thelonious Monk – Ruby, My Dear

This 32-bar ballad is a slow, moody song that was composed in 1945 and actually first titled “Manhattan Moods.” It was later retitled after Thelonious Monk’s first love and older sister’s best friend, Ruby. 

Monk’s percussive approach to the piano provides a perfect accompaniment for a deep spinal twist. With each strike of the piano, twist deeper into the pose. Monk was also famous for his idiosyncratic habit of stopping in the middle of a performance to stand up and dance for a few moments before returning to play, so this tune would also be a good one to listen to while holding the more difficult dancer pose!

WJ3 All-Stars – Cry Me A River

At this point in the yoga practice, some emotions may be bubbling up. No worries. That’s normal. As our bodies unfurl, so do some of those pent-up feelings. This bluesy jazz ballad will encourage you to accept and embrace all of your emotions, even the bad ones. Because that’s part of the therapeutic benefit of yoga—to release the negativity weighing you down. Let it slide off your body like drops of sweat while you hold tight in the intricate eagle pose. 

I hope that you enjoyed this yoga session and if you’re looking for more relaxing songs to guide your practice, I would recommend the album Colors of Jazz. With songs like “Introspection,” “Discoveries” and “Dew Drop” this recent release from the WJ3 All Stars will have you unwinding in no time! Colors of Jazz is available in our store now and on all major music platforms. 

What songs should you listen to while gardening?

Yay, it’s finally May! I don’t know about you but my favorite thing about this month is the
beautiful flowers that are blooming left and right. And if you’re a gardener, you’re probably
feeling especially satisfied right about now. There’s nothing like seeing and enjoying the fruits
of your labor. So, while you’re outside admiring and collecting an assortment of crocuses,
daffodils, hyacinths and tulips for a bouquet, turn on these lovely songs. They’ll whisk you away
into a flowery dreamland.


Freddie Hubbard – Up Jumped Spring

Freddie Hubbard, a jazz trumpeter from Indianapolis, had a signature tone that influenced the
new perspectives of modern jazz and bebop music in the 1960s and 1970s. This song comes
from his 1967 album Backlash, which was lauded for its “soulful modernism.” The soft yet quick
trumpet and the dance of the flute in this cheery tune reminds of the bright pansies and violas
that bloom in spring!


Katie Melua – Mary Pickford (Used to Eat Roses)

Inspired by the film actress from the 1910s, Mary Pickford, this light tune is be a pastiche of the
classic silent-film era song “At the Moving Picture Ball” because its rhythm and subject matter is
similar to the 1920 song. The folksy feel and fun lyrics, Mary Pickford used to eat roses / Though
that they’d make her beautiful and they did, / One supposes, will make you want to pluck one of
your own juicy red roses and pop the soft petals into your mouth!

Duke Ellington – A Flower Is A Lovesome Thing

This slow, smooth song from the brilliant jazz legend, Duke Ellington, evokes the buttery
yellows of daffodils and forsythia. Composed by Billy Strayhorn in 1941, this song has
essentially become a jazz standard over the years, and I can see why—nothing is more lovable
than a beautiful flower.

WJ3 All-Stars – Gee Baby Ain’t It Good To See You

Since flowers are lovesome things, then why not listen to a love song while gardening?
Especially a love song about reunion. This jazz standard was written by Andy Razaf and Don
Redman in 1929 and has been reimagined in 2020 by the world-class artists, Willie Jones III,
Ralph Moore, Steve Davis, Terell Stafford, Donald Vega and Gerald Cannon. Let yourself get
swept away by this beautiful love story because gee baby, after the long winter, ain’t it good to
see some flowers again?

If you’re looking for some more lovely songs to listen to while you’re gardening, arranging and
daydreaming, I would recommend WJ3 All-Stars newest release, Lovers and Love Songs.
Featuring modern and inspiring renditions of iconic jazz standards, this album will take you on a romantic journey through the ages. Lovers and Love Songs is available on all major music
platforms and in our store. And if you’d like to book one of our musicians for a spring event,
luncheon or tea party, please contact us today.

When is Father’s Day 2021?

Father’s Day is celebrated annually on the third Sunday in June, so this year, that means Father’s Day is on June 20th! The holiday was founded in 1910 in Spokane, Washington by a woman named Sonora Smart Dodd. Dodd wanted a day to honor her father, a Civil War veteran who raised six children as a single parent, so she proposed the idea to her church. Initially, Dodd wanted the day to land on her father’s birthday, June 5th, but the pastors did not have enough time to prepare their sermons, so they decided on the third Sunday in June instead. 

Well, now that you know some of the history behind Father’s Day and its observation time, you might be wondering, what kind of music and what songs should you listen to during the celebration of paternal bonds? Well look no further because we have a playlist that’ll impress any dad!

The Temptations – Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone

An award-winning dad deserves award-winning music, like this 1972 Motown classic, which was the number-one hit on the Billboard Hot 100 and the winner of not one, not two, but three Grammy awards. Featuring a variety of instrumental textures, like the plucked bass guitar solo, the hi-hat cymbal drumming, wah-wah guitar and electric piano, this groovy, soulful tune will be sure to get your dad’s head nodding. 

George Strait – Love Without End, Amen

If your dad is a country music fan, he’ll definitely be familiar with this tune from the “King of Country,” George Strait. The song is about a boy who was sent home from school one day for fighting. He told his father what happened and stood there on those tremblin’ knees, waitin’ for the worst. But the boy’s father surprisingly said, let me tell you a secret about a father’s love… daddies don’t just love their children every now and then, it’s a love without end, amen. The sweet, sentimental lyrics might just make you and your dad tear up this Father’s Day—I know my eyes are watering! 

James Brown – Papa’s Got a Brand New Bag 

With its rhythmic innovations, this 1965 tune was formative in the development of funk music as a distinct style. Brown sings about an old man who was brave enough to get out on the dancefloor and try something new by busting a move. Maybe this is the tune that’ll finally get your dad to put his dancing shoes on and show y’all what he’s made of! 

Janis Siegel, John Di Martino & Lonnie Plaxico – Always on My Mind

Your dad is bound to know this iconic song, which has been covered by everyone from Elvis to Loretta Lynn, and of course, the most popular version from Willie Nelson in 1982. But has your dad ever heard a jazz ballad treatment of “Always on My Mind”? The answer is probably no, at least not until now. In this jazzy rendition, Janis Siegel and John Di Martino highlight the bittersweet regret and remorse, and also feature a lovely flute solo by Aaron Heick. They say you can’t teach an old dog new tricks, but your dad might just love this new version of the classic tune!

And if you’re fretting over what to get dad this Father’s Day, we have a suggestion: Cryin’ in My Whiskey. This album features country classics, like, “Always on My Mind,” “Where Do I Put His Memory?” and “I Fall to Pieces,” that are all spiced up with a fresh jazzy twist—perfect for the dad who might want to try something new without straying too far away from his country music comfort zone! 

“Cryin’ In My Whiskey” is available in our store right now and on all major music platforms! 

What songs were popular during World War II?

In honor of D-Day—the decisive Allied invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944 that led to the liberation of France and western Europe from Nazi control—we’re going to take a look at the type of music and the songs that were popular during WWII. 

With the advent of the radio in the 20s and 30s, American music was very accessible to everyone, so when the United States went to war in 1941, swing and jazz music provided comfort to families at home and soldiers abroad. Unlike the militaristic and patriotic songs of World War I, popular music during WWII centered around romance and strength. Now, let’s listen to some of the songs that boosted the morale of our veterans!

Glenn Miller – Chattanooga Choo Choo

Written by Mack Gordon and composed by Harry Warren in 1941, this song was originally recorded as a big band/swing tune and was featured in the movie Sun Valley Serenade. The tune opens with the trumpets and trombones imitating a train whistle and the whole band sounding like a train rolling out of a station. 

Next, we get a dialogue between a shoeshine boy and a passenger. The passenger describes the route from New York through Baltimore and North Carolina until finally reaching Chattanooga, where he plans to settle down for good with a woman he knew from earlier in life. With the fun instrumental imitations of a train’s “choo choo,” it’s no wonder that this became the first song to receive a gold record for selling 1.2 million copies!

Johnny Mercer – G.I. Jive

Johnny Mercer wrote and performed this song in 1944 with the intention of making something that the soldiers would like, and boy did it hit it on the head! This tune became the biggest hit of all the songs that revolved around soldier life during World War II. Roodley-toot, jump in your suit, make a salute! 

When the Lights Go On Again – Vaughn Monroe

This hopeful and calming song, which reached number one on the charts in 1943, looked forward to the time when the boys are home again all over the world and rain or snow is all that may fall from the skies above. A time when a kiss won’t mean “Goodbye” but “Hello to love.” This song really shows the power of music to raise one’s spirits and to unite people from all around the world. 

King Cole Trio – Gee, Baby, Ain’t I Good to You

This love song was originally written in 1929 but became popular in 1944 with the recoding from the King Cole Trio. IT reached #1 on the Harlem Hite Parade, which charted the top songs in the Harlem district of New York City. And now, the classic tune has been reimagined by the legendary WJ3 All-Stars! 

If you’re looking for some more modern renditions of classics from the 20s, 30s and 40s, look no further than Lovers and Love Songs, WJ3 All-Star’s most recent release. The album is available inn our store and on all major music platforms!

Are there any female jazz producers?

Although there are many famous female singers and performers, there are very few women behind the mixing console. According to BBC, more than 95% of record producers and sound engineers are men. This may be because the industry has a “boys club” atmosphere and many women are not inclined to pursue such a demanding career while also trying to raise a family. Yet, there are still some women who have risen to the challenge and succeed as jazz producers. Today we’re here to recognize these badass women who are making moves in today’s day and age!

Amy Denio – Seattle, WA 

Amy Denio is an award-winning composer and producer who was inducted into the Seattle Jazz Hall of Fame in March 2015. Not only has she produced over 50 releases, but she is also able to play the guitar, bass, alto sax, clarinet, accordion, and she can sing four octaves! In 1986, Denio founded her own record label and publishing company, Spoot Music, and has since collaborated with musicians from all over the world—Taiwan, Japan, Hong Kong, India, Brazil, Bolivia and Argentina just to name a few. During the COVID-19 pandemic, Denio has been working on her “Corona Sonora” series, which consists of a wide variety of compositions that musically interpret the death and infection tolls in cities where Denio has previously resided.  

Yoshie Nakayama – Los Angeles, CA

A graduate of the Kunitachi College of Music and the Berklee College of Music in Boston, Yoshie Nakayma is a producer, trombonist, arranger, composer, singer and educator who specializes in jazzy a-cappella productions. Her creative vision is wide-ranging, including traditional Japanese songs, jazz big band, orchestra, Motown and more. She has contributed to over 400 recordings, worked with great mentors like Billy Bob Thorton and Alejandro Sanz, and she is the official arranger of the UNIVOZ Vocal Ensemble. Currently, Nakayama is working as one of the founders of the global initiative, Songs for World Peace, which promotes peace through the power of music. 

Kristina Koller – New York City, NY

Kristina Koller was exposed to a vast array of music and dance during her childhood outside of New York City, which led her to pursue jazz music, solo performance and formal music education at The City College of New York. Using her four-octave vocals, Koller creates powerful songs that project empowerment through self-discovery and awareness. And not only is she a professional vocalist, but Koller is also currently producing a synth pop record. As a producer, she specializes in transforming jazz standards into contemporary arrangements by using elements of R&B, pop and rock. 

Suzana Laşcu – Rotterdam, Netherlands

A graduate of Prins Claus Conservatorium and Codarts University, Suzana Laşcu is a performer, poet and composer who specializes in producing and curating sonic content. Her work aims to address all that permeates culture and is thus very transdisciplinary in nature, weaving across multiple genres—jazz, experimental, acoustic and electronic. Laşcu takes a non-traditional approach to music by incorporating extended techniques, spoken word and non-temperate sound producing effects. Currently, in 2021, she has begun broadcasting her most recent works on Radio WORM in Rotterdam. 

Kathy Salem – Cleveland, Ohio

As the founder and managing director of the jazz booking agency Night is Alive, Kathy Salem produces classical and jazz concerts worldwide with the goal of widening the influence of jazz music. Music has always held a sacred place in Salem’s heart: she played piano as a child, taught herself to read music in church and studied classic music formally for five years. Now, with Night is Alive, Salem represents some of the most talented and distinguished artists in the industry, such as Willie Jones III, Bill Cunliffe, Jeff Rupert and Donald Vega. She also offers academic scholarships to emerging musicians who are still attending college, which will foster a. love for jazz music in the next generation. Most recently, Salem produced the 2021 album, Cryin’ In My Whiskey, which infuses classic country hits with a jazz twist and features the vocals of Janis Siegel and piano of John di Martino. 

Cryin’ In My Whiskey is available in our store now and on all major music platforms. 

Which songs should you play at a graduation party?

Graduation parties can be a challenging terrain when it comes to music and playlists. You want to play tunes that the graduate, usually from a younger generation, can enjoy, but you also want to play music that the guests, usually older relatives, will also enjoy. Basically, you want some classic tunes that’ll put everyone in a good mood and possibly generate conversation. Well, look no further because we got you covered with this list! 

Gene Krupa & Buddy Rich – The Monster

This 1956 song from the jazz drummer duo Krupa and Rich really showcases how lively, fun and upbeat jazz music can be. And the tune is completely instrumental, which is perfect for party conversations. The vibrant drums will fade nicely into the backdrop of the party, energizing everyone without anyone even realizing it! 

Bill Withers – Lovely Day

We all know Bill Withers’s most famous song, Lean on Me, which is usually a staple at graduation parties, but what about mixing it up and playing this 1977 hit Lovely Day? It’s a very lowkey, relaxed song that can help everyone, from all walks of life, wind down and get in a good mood. I know it’s going to be a lovely day! 

The Lovin’ Spoonful – Do You Believe in Magic

Thanks to the 2005 rendition, from Disney stars Ally & AJ, people from all generations are familiar with this classic tune, which peaked at number 9 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1965. And no one will be able disagree with the message of the lyrics—that music has the magical power to make you happy and free your soul!

Islands in the Stream – Dolly Parton & Kenny Rogers

This lovely 1983 duet from two of country music’s biggest stars has a smooth, mellow soft rock feel to it that everyone can appreciate. And did you know that the title comes from the 1970 Ernest Hemingway novel of the same name? If your graduate majored in English, be sure to quiz them on this fact!

Janis Siegel, John di Martino & Lonnie Plaxico – Whenever You Come Around

Everyone loves a good love song, especially a new rendition of a beloved favorite. In this version, the talented composer, arranger and pianist John di Martino infuses Vince Gill’s 1994 country song with a soulful, funky Booker T. and the M.G.’s feel. This tune will make you want to get a groove on with your sweetheart!
If you need some more ideas for songs to play at a graduation party, be sure to check out the newest release from Night is Alive, Cryin’ In My Whiskey. From this album comes the last track on this playlist, along with many more snazzy, jazzy renditions of country classics, like Willie Nelson’s Always On My Mind and Crystal Gayle’s Don’t It Make My Brown Eyes Blue. And if you’d like to book one of our wonderful musicians to perform at your event, please contact us today.

4 Tunes to Jam While You Work Out!

With the weather warming up and COVID cooling down, it’s a great time to grab those running shoes and hit the pavement, or to renew that lapsed gym membership, and burn off that pandemic fifteen! But what music to listen to? Maybe you’re not a fan of the popular workout mixes of our day and age—rap, hip-hop, dubstep—and want some fast-paced, upbeat tunes that have a more instrumental, jazzy, and classic feel to them. Well, look no further because we’ve got you covered!

Lorca Hart Trio – MoJoe

With the stay-at-home orders and limited access to gyms during the pandemic, many of us may’ve have lost our mojo when it comes to working out. But don’t worry, this song, a drum solo from Lorca Hart himself, will help you get your mojo back. Show everyone what you can do, just like those impressive drumbeats! 

Junkie XL, Elvis Presley – A Little Less Conversation

In 2001, Dutch musician Tom Holkenborg, better known as Junkie XL, was the first artist to receive authorization from the Elvis Presley foundation to remix an Elvis song. The product is an electronic, funky sound that lowers Elvis’s voice and draws even more attention to the lively guitars, horns and drumbeats from the 1968 tune. So, let’s listen to Elvis, and have a little less conversation, a little more action lifting those weights!

 

Chócala – Humboldt

This obscure jazz quartet from Charlotte, North Carolina produces a unique, energizing and vibrant sound, especially in this tune, which features fervent percussion, powerful vocals and smooth saxophone. In Spanish, ‘chócala’ means high-five, which is very fitting for this snappy, jubilant group that’ll make you want to high-five the person sweating on the treadmill next to you!

The Brian Setzer Orchestra – Jump, Jive an’ Wail

I don’t know about you, but nothing makes me want to move like some spirited swing music, especially when the refrain of the tune is telling me to jump, jive an’ wail! This swing and jump blues band covered Louis Prima’s 1956 song on their 1998 album The Dirty Boogie and the result is a fast-moving piece that’ll push you to finish out that last rep strong!
If you enjoyed these tunes and are looking for more enthusiastic music to motivate you to work out, I would recommend the Lorca Hart Trio’s album, Colors of Jazz, which features a variety of songs representing all the colors of the rainbow. Lorca Hart’s impassioned drumming will be sure to get you stepping back into your workout groove in no time! Colors of Jazz is available in our store right now and on all major music platforms.

5 Tunes to Get You Movin’ on International Dance Day

Whether it be Zumba, ballet, belly dance, hip hop, shuffle dance or the waltz, we all have a sweet spot, or secret talent, for some kind of dance style! And even if you don’t think of yourself as a great dancer, you have to admit, dancing makes you feel alive, so why not get your groove on this Thursday for International Dance Day?

WJ3 All Stars – I’m An Old Cow Hand

Originally sung by Bing Crosby in 1936 for the movie, Rhythm on the Range, this rollicking tune was a huge hit in its day and could always get people clapping and tapping their toes. Now, nearly a century later, the song is brought back to life by world-class artists, Willie Jones III and his All-Stars. This smooth and snazzy rendition is a great song to warm up those dancing muscles of yours!

Fred Astaire – The Way You Look Tonight

We all know and love the Frank Sinatra version of this song. It’s a staple at most weddings is a very popular first dance song. But did you know that “The Way You Look Tonight” was first performed by Fred Astaire in the 1936 movie “Swing Time” and that it won the Academy Award for the Best Original Song? Well, nothing says International Dance Day, like the famous dancer, Fred Astaire, for whom the ballroom dance franchise was named! You’ll definitely want to grab a partner and get on the dancefloor for this classic!

Little Willie John – I’m Shakin’ 

With the lyrics, I got a knocking in my knees and a wobble in my walk, I just don’t know how this song won’t motivate you to get up and bust a move! Little Willie John, who was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996, was a notable figure in R&B music of the 1950s, and he certainly knows how to give your legs the jitters!  

Lorca Hart Trio – Dayne

As part of their new Colors of Jazz album, the Lorca Hart Trio have created a vivid tribute to Miles Davis and Wayne Shorter, who were certainly some jazz stars that could get you on your feet! This upbeat, fast-paced song evokes the image of a bright yellow sports car, speeding down the road, and will be sure to have you twistin’ and groovin’, or at the very least, snapping your fingers along to the beat! 

Etta Jones – Till There Was You

Let’s slow things down a bit with this last one. Etta Jones’s lovely version of this 1957 song is so soft and heartwarming that it’ll make you just want to melt into the arms of your sweetheart during a slow dance, which to me sounds like the very best way to end a long night of movin’ and shakin’. 

If the songs by Lorca Hart Trio and WJ3 All Stars caught your fancy, then look no further. Both of these groups newest albums are available right now in our shop. And if you’d like to book one of our musicians for an upcoming party or event, contact us today.

April Showers Bring May Flowers – 5 Rainy Day Songs

Just because it’s raining outside doesn’t mean that your mood has to be dreary and dark. Remember, April showers bring May flowers! Sometimes, a tough, gloomy period is watering the very seeds that’ll sprout and grow into something beautiful and joyous in the future, so go get yourself a nice warm cup of tea, snuggle up and listen to these lovely tunes on your rainy April day! 

Elvis – Pocketful of Rainbows

We all know and love the King of Rock and Roll, but have you ever listened to his lesser-known gem of a song, “Pocketful of Rainbows”? Released in 1960, this slower-paced tune is perfect for a rainy day inside. Like Elvis sings so beautifully, we need not worry whenever skies are gray above because we have a pocketful of rainbows and a heart full of love.

Otis Redding – Cigarettes and Coffee

From his 1966 “The Soul Album,” this song is a poignant meditation from the perspective of a man lingering in the early morning, sittin’ here talkin’ with my baby. The protagonist is in absolutely no rush to get started with his day. He sings to his darling about how grateful he is that she’s in his life, and how grateful he is for this simple moment together: I’ve known nothing but good old joy since I met you… I would love to have another drink of coffee, now, and please, darling, help me smoke this one more cigarette. 

Lorca Hart Trio – Dew Drop

As the Lorca Hart Trio proves in this wonderful jazz song, released in 2020, a drop of dew can be oh so delicate, beautiful and precious. Slow down and notice the dew drops outside all around you, on flowers, leaves, branches. A dew drop is in no hurry to go anywhere, it just exists in that very moment, which is exactly what you can do on this drizzly day. 

Etta James – A Sunday Kind of Love

I don’t know about you, but this song is a staple on my rainy Sunday morning playlist. Etta James’s powerful voice and the clever lyrics in this 1960 tune just soften and warm my heart into butter. But did you know that Etta James was not the first artist to release this song? It was actually composed by Barbara Belle, Anita Leonard, Stan Rhodes and Louis Prima and published in 1946. Many musicians like Fran Warren, Ella Fitzgerald and The Del Vikings came out with versions of this beloved song.

WJ3 All Stars – First Time I Saw Your Face

This slow, smooth song from WJ3 All Stars’ newest album, “Lovers & Love Songs” will have you reminiscing on the very first time that you ever met your darling—the twinkling in his or her eyes, the dimples on the cheeks and the smile that stole your heart forever. This song is perfect for cuddling up next to your loved one and savoring all those sweet memories you have together. 

If you’re looking for more soft jazz songs to keep you nice and cozy during all the rainy days this April, I would recommend the WJ3 All Stars’ album “Lovers & Love Songs” and the Lorca Hart Trio’s “Colors of Jazz.” Both are available in our store right now and on all major music platforms!